A quest to explore and rescue the historical heritage of remote mountainous regions.

What DO we do?

RESEARCH

1. Find and study old maps, books, logs, and reports.

2. Contact explorers or their families if deceased.

3. Find out the location of climbed summits, names, and routes.

EXPLORATION

1. Expeditions to know the areas and explore new terrain.

2. Make significant first ascents and new routes.

3. Interview local people about names and previous explorations.

OUTREACH

1. Keep real-time blogs during our expeditions to engage followers. 

2. Share our expeditions in magazines, websites and journals.

3. Produce high-quality maps rescuing geographical names and routes.

4. Share information about significant first ascents yet to be done.

 

Maps

You can see our maps in full resolution by zooming in the window that is offered next to each description, you can also open it in full-screen by clicking the magnifying glass. If needed, you can download a digital copy after making a donation to UNCHARTED so that we can continue to explore the most remote mountains and share them with you.

We only ask you not to redistribute the map, as it is essential for the project to know how many people, who and why are interested in the map. In addition, all those who have received the map will receive updated maps every time we significantly improve or correct it. Support our project: don't redistribute it.

It is important to note that the project seeks to rescue the exploration heritage of Patagonia, so the maps compile the routes of the main explorations in each area and the original names of the geographical features as coined by the first explorers. Therefore, it is not guided by the official names, although it does compile all the geographical names on the official cartography, as long as these do not conflict with those coined by the first explorers. The routes do not pretend to be "trekking guides", instead, they rescue the itineraries followed by the first explorers.

Cordillera de Sarmiento

This is the first map that we developed in UNCHARTED, capturing the unknown and fascinating Cordillera de Sarmiento. Just 60 km west of Puerto Natales, this mountain range offers extraordinary mountain challenges, among which are numerous unclimbed peaks.
This map lists all the routes and toponyms we have managed to collect for the area, including those coined by the explorers of these storm-battered mountains. Explorers who continue to challenge its rock and ice towers from the 1970s to date.

 

Northern Patagonian Icefield

It is a huge icy expanse that stretches 100 km north-south and is surrounded by rugged mountains. It is a region that exerts an irresistible attraction on mountaineers on all fronts since it hosts both vertical granite walls, as well as dream slopes for skiing, ice walls and also the highest summit in Patagonia: Mount San Valentin with 4,032 m. In the shadow of this colossus hides endless and beautiful realm of anonymous mountains.

 

Cordillera Darwin

This mountain range stretches 150 km from west to east and is located in Tierra del Fuego between the Almirantazgo fjord and the Beagle Channel. It is a completely uninhabited region, the closest cities are Ushuaia (Argentina, 50 km) and Punta Arenas (Chile, 140 km). It is presented as a disjointed sequence of abrupt mountain ranges, fragmented by countless fjords and gigantic glaciers that meander from the summits to the sea. It is full of extraordinary mountain challenges and pristine peaks of all difficulty levels.

Coming next

Santa Inés Island

Hoste Island

Muñoz Gamero Peninsula

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Base (Sentinel-2 28 Marzo 2017)_preview.
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Gallery

Falso Ilse peak.
Falso Ilse peak.

In clear view of everyone entering into the Southern Icefield through the Marconi pass. This gem was still unclimbed, calling us to attempt its unttroden summit. ©Camilo Ra­da­

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Camilo Rada and Natalia Martínez towards the challenge of reaching the summit of the Falso Ilse.
Camilo Rada and Natalia Martínez towards the challenge of reaching the summit of the Falso Ilse.

This would be just the beginning of the joint endervours of these adventurers who would launch themselves to the exploration of this beautiful territory. ­©Natalia Martinez­

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Coming down happy for having achieved our goal.
Coming down happy for having achieved our goal.

©Camilo Ra­da­

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Falso Ilse peak.
Falso Ilse peak.

In clear view of everyone entering into the Southern Icefield through the Marconi pass. This gem was still unclimbed, calling us to attempt its unttroden summit. ©Camilo Ra­da­

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Falso Ilse

2008

Reclus volcano
Reclus volcano

Disembark at the Amalia Fjord, where the ground stage of the expedition will begin. © Natalia Martinez

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Abandoned !!! haha
Abandoned !!! haha

©Camilo Ra­da­

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Skorpios III always supporting our project and our crazy adventures!
Skorpios III always supporting our project and our crazy adventures!

­©Natalia Martinez­

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Reclus volcano
Reclus volcano

Disembark at the Amalia Fjord, where the ground stage of the expedition will begin. © Natalia Martinez

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Reclus volcano

2008

The Cordillera de Sarmiento has generated fascination since 1580. After 250 years of oblivion, this Mountain Range witnessed the fervent spirit of a young Fitz Roy. Its eternal clouds plunged it into oblivion again until the middle of the 20th century, when from the summit of Mount Burney, Eric Shipton contemplated with mountaineer's eyes its challenging summits, which soon seduced North American and English adventurers who set out to explore its mountains, defended by the harshest climate.

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With our Friend Daniel, great host in Puerto Natales.
With our Friend Daniel, great host in Puerto Natales.

©Camilo Ra­da­

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Starting the descent from the high camp to the base with killer mega backpacks!
Starting the descent from the high camp to the base with killer mega backpacks!

©Camilo Ra­da­

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The Cordillera de Sarmiento has generated fascination since 1580. After 250 years of oblivion, this Mountain Range witnessed the fervent spirit of a young Fitz Roy. Its eternal clouds plunged it into oblivion again until the middle of the 20th century, when from the summit of Mount Burney, Eric Shipton contemplated with mountaineer's eyes its challenging summits, which soon seduced North American and English adventurers who set out to explore its mountains, defended by the harshest climate.

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Cordillera de Sarmiento

 2012

The 2207 meters of the imposing Mount Sarmiento rising from the waters of the southern sea.
The 2207 meters of the imposing Mount Sarmiento rising from the waters of the southern sea.

©Ines Dussaillant

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Part of the CORDARWIN.13 expedition, which will carry out scientific, exploration, and documentary w
Part of the CORDARWIN.13 expedition, which will carry out scientific, exploration, and documentary w

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From Punta Arenas, the Uncharted team delights in the magnificent view of Mount Sarmiento.
From Punta Arenas, the Uncharted team delights in the magnificent view of Mount Sarmiento.

©Ana Maria Rada

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The 2207 meters of the imposing Mount Sarmiento rising from the waters of the southern sea.
The 2207 meters of the imposing Mount Sarmiento rising from the waters of the southern sea.

©Ines Dussaillant

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Mount Sarmiento

2013

We set off to cross the Northern Icefield from East to West to reach the Aysén Range.
We set off to cross the Northern Icefield from East to West to reach the Aysén Range.

©Camilo Rada

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Jonathan Leidich, one of the landowners of the Soler Valley, and who went looking for us with his "L
Jonathan Leidich, one of the landowners of the Soler Valley, and who went looking for us with his "L

©Natalia Martinez

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One more moment of routine for Don Ramón and Doña Marta, while we continue to be fascinated with thi
One more moment of routine for Don Ramón and Doña Marta, while we continue to be fascinated with thi

©Natalia Martinez

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We set off to cross the Northern Icefield from East to West to reach the Aysén Range.
We set off to cross the Northern Icefield from East to West to reach the Aysén Range.

©Camilo Rada

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Aysén range

2017

Aguilera Volcano, one of the most prominent unclimbed peaks in Patagonia.
Aguilera Volcano, one of the most prominent unclimbed peaks in Patagonia.

©Natalia Martinez

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Arriving at the beach of the Spegazzini arm of Lake Argentino.
Arriving at the beach of the Spegazzini arm of Lake Argentino.

©Natalia Martinez

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When we were beginning to hesitate ... the boat appears, ending this wonderful adventure.
When we were beginning to hesitate ... the boat appears, ending this wonderful adventure.

©Natalia Martinez

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Aguilera Volcano, one of the most prominent unclimbed peaks in Patagonia.
Aguilera Volcano, one of the most prominent unclimbed peaks in Patagonia.

©Natalia Martinez

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Aguilera volcano

2014

Mount Malaspina, a beautiful unclimbed peak like many in this remote region.
Mount Malaspina, a beautiful unclimbed peak like many in this remote region.

©Camilo Ra­da­

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The Helio Currier that took us to the distant frozen lands of Mt. Malaspina.
The Helio Currier that took us to the distant frozen lands of Mt. Malaspina.

©Tom Bradley

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Aftyer weeks of black&white, we see the first full-color landscapes!
Aftyer weeks of black&white, we see the first full-color landscapes!

©Natalia Martinez­

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Mount Malaspina, a beautiful unclimbed peak like many in this remote region.
Mount Malaspina, a beautiful unclimbed peak like many in this remote region.

©Camilo Ra­da­

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Mount Malaspina

2015

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Coming soon...

SPI - 2020

 

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BIO

UNCHARTED is a project that seeks to explore and rescue the historical heritage of Patagonian and Antarctic mountaineering through the creation of maps, explorations and historical research in regions chosen for their null or deficient existing cartography and for being places of great interest for lovers of the mountain, forgotten places that have been populated with names after the footsteps of the mountaineers who have forged dreams and hardships for decades between their snowy peaks, their impenetrable forests, their peat bogs and their intricate fjords, always fighting to the beat of the relentless climate of the Patagonia and Antarctica.

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